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Please keep praying for Archer to recover; we are storming heaven! I thought my chest would burst in gratitude for each of them, that gesture, that love, that solidarity. I felt assured and confident that we would figure it out. And really, rehab is the priority of the injured athlete. But even if Archer had not been complicated, he would still have wanted both, to devote time to rehab and to his education. But the truth of it all is that Archer was just very complicated. And all of you, with your prayers created the energy field for what is happening now. We knew it was an unusual surgery, that is, to actually remove a pace maker, but we knew it was getting more and more risky the longer we waited. Archer has been building stamina for a year now to be able to get on to the GEO and stay and remain upright without any heart or Blood Pressure or Autonomic Dysreflexia issues. I just love to watch it move Archer’s feet and legs. There is a mirror in the GEO room in which he can watch himself. For every step you take today or tomorrow, or really just a mindful moment of one step, feel the love and freedom in that step and what it means. Well, there he was crossing the threshold of the screening suite. Man o man, can he move quickly with that stylus on an ipad and an iphone.This picture was taken outside of The Food Market in Hampden, Baltimore on Archer’s birthday in July. I couldn’t help but feel joy and gratitude in every cell of my being as I watched Archer roll across the Mc Donogh School stage this past Monday. Archer maneuvered his powerchair using the T-bar in which his left hand rests, powered also by his left shoulder pushing his hand as if an extension. I quickly learned that none of these facilities dealing with acute rehab is equipped to teach or provide teaching while in-patient. His recovery was complicated, and honestly, his intellectual ability was complicated as it was near impossible to find teacher matches for him if the goal was to graduate a/k/a staying on course with the classes he would have otherwise been taking which were all AP’s and high level math. But I had no idea it was anything different than any other catastrophic injury like quadriplegia. So, last June, a wonderful surgeon at Johns Hopkins successfully removed it and all 42 feet of leads around Archer’s ventricles. I am sure that mirror neurons are sending messages to his brain, Remember walking? A machine like the GEO simulating what his body knows how to do already, maybe it will not only strengthen, but maybe it will wake it up. He stays up until 1am on many if not most school nights which concerns us on one hand and which we also admire on the other as he is driven to move forward and learn and do well in life despite the injury.His research interests include Electronic Health Records, Clinical Data Management, Clinical Imaging Systems, Clinical Simulation and Virtual Reality Systems, Computational Medicine, Software Engineering, Human Factors, Speech-Based Systems, Handheld and Mobile Computing, and Bioinformatics.He is also a semi-professional trumpet player and is interested in the specific medical needs of performing artists, especially instrumental musicians.Right now, Archer is paralyzed from the top of the chest on down. Each upper school student who was also being inducted into Cum Laude Society, each wearing their kaki pants or skirts and their navy blue school blazers with the Mc Donogh seal, each was also donning another emblem, the small one-inch orange and black button with the words Archer Strong written across. Almost every student from the past year who was on stage as well as the current students receiving the prestigious and hard-earned academic honor, one by one, walked onto the stage with the Archer Strong button on the lapel of their blazer, boys and girls alike. They didn’t have to share it in that way, but they did. It didn’t take anything away; it made for greater celebration of each of them. Kernan was more honest in saying they didn’t do school, they did rehab. Remember about a week or so ago that news report about the experimental stem cell injections for a quadriplegic man? A friend sent me the email address I needed to try and reach the researchers. I gave them a brief overview of Archer’s condition and profile. This is what they were looking for: the perfect profile. There were many malades who had been recommended and they were each being interviewed and assessed that particular weekend at Mercy Hospital in Baltimore. When I arrived passing through the security and up onto the elevator, I slipped into a coatroom, hung up my coat, and stepped out into the hallway. He was brain damaged and partially paralyzed in his legs from a heart attack he had while running a marathon, now age 19, and medical help was not able to get to him for 15 minutes. His screaming, if you will, was the last memory I had as he was discharged and sent to another facility. I told her quickly the barriers and specifically what to demonstrate. He’s really amazing and thought long and hard about these things.The Senfts believe in miracles and the power of your prayers. I loved each one of those dear young persons so very much in that moment. Shepherd assured me they had had other athletes graduate and that they would help transition him back to his school after he left there. Well, I emailed that doctor so fast since it looked as if Archer might be a good candidate based on the article. Remember last summer when we were angsting about when we could get that pace maker removed? Billy and I were at our house that Saturday in the middle of a meeting with a woman re college financial aid when I felt this really strong pull to go downtown to the Lourdes screening. Whom should I lay eyes on rolling through the entranceway but the boy/young man who had been Archer’s roommate when we first arrived at KKI in-patient. I recall his prognosis was that his speech and eyesight might slowly be restored and I felt hopeful for him. I could feel the unity like two schoolgirls hatching a good plan to do something together. Yes, he remains a top AP student, gifted in math and physics and yes, he had amazing scores on his SAT and yes, he also submitted an art portfolio of his digital work and yes, he’s been working tirelessly on school work with his “one finger” as he calls it, this metal stylus which we carefully attach every morning to a Velcro hand and wrist splint and then wrap both around his arm which he then powers, literally, by moving his bicep and shoulder.

He completed a residency at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is board certified in Internal Medicine.

We are grateful for the outpouring of support we have received. No hardware in the body other than the rods in the neck. The only thing that might give us trouble is they are looking for a C5 injury. We would plan to go for the surgery as soon as Archer graduates in June. If selected, it would mean the potential for him to regain his triceps, so he would have the muscle in the back of his arm to move his elbow, which would make Archer very very happy. And, it’s as if a door opened that we hadn’t anticipated at least at this moment. So many people from around the world have been healed, Christians and non-Christians. There is a sense of self in unity with God and with God through others. And a great deal of laughter and conversation and quiet prayer. I smiled over the phone lines, Oh you know all the usual stuff that prevented Archer from going. And also being in close proximity to the School of Engineering was very important. I took him after a snowstorm in March and there were a few streets that were difficult to cross given UPenn are in the middle of Philadelphia. We are in the beginning of seeing the fruits of a beginning collaboration at UPenn.

Click Here for more info about how the donations are processed to help Archer. But you’ve got to get your son the hell out of there. She confirmed what I felt, what I knew but did not know. Archer as you know is very “high injury” as they say, meaning high on the C spine, a/k/a not good, as a C2-C5 burst, but technically he is a C5 as that is where they placed his rods after they reconstructed his neck from the donor (thank you again, dear donor, you donated your hip bone and Archer is the beneficiary). It could also mean a restoration of the sensation in his arms below the elbow to his wrists, which could mean he might be able to grasp items between his two wrists because he could feel them rather than just meet such items now with stiff extension arms and droopy hands. Bruno Lanteri, please intercede for us as we ask for mercy. So, you might be assuming that Archer is going with me. Well, that woman came in with her son like a drill sergeant. We didn’t want to be demanding nor did I want a situation where we were adding things. We really did explore a number of dorms, but either facilities or disabilities had concerns or I had concerns. The curb cuts were still icy in some places but the most typical scenario was that the snow for walkers had been plowed and dumped in the curb cut, the only place someone in a wheelchair can go to get up onto a sidewalk. Can you believe it, already well into a new year and half way into year two for us on this journey with Archer and his quadriplegia. Last fall, Archer was admitted Early Decision into the School of Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania as part of the class of 2021. Stepping back to look at the big picture, it’s a big deal that he is even graduating from high school on time.

It was a close call, avoided by interception of a faculty member. Another standing ovation, 3 in all, all initiated by the students. Britton’s side to make it easier for his headmaster to drape the yellow gold ribbon and Cum Laude Society pin around Archer’s neck. And there it was, the symbol of an academic achievement worn around his neck. No 18 year old should be required to navigate the adult academia world on issues unrelated to academics. If you have any ideas for us, please pass them along. When he visited last summer and fall, one person in the Engineering School expressed doubt that Archer could be fast enough to code on a computer given he had use of only “one finger”.

We all waited and I think watched as much in curiosity as in amazement. I have met with some closeminded thinkers and I have met with some amazing people who were not only creative thinkers, but I could tell they were believers. I feel pretty good about where we are now at UPenn for Archer, their decision to accept him and his decision to say I do, and the team we are building there for his care. This was similar to Billy’s and my beloved alma mater, University of Virginia, who told Archer on a visit last summer that they couldn’t see 1.